Paraphyletic

Medicine and human biology
Science News

… “I thought it was very odd to have only one positive emotion,” says cognitive scientist Aleix Martinez of Ohio State University in Columbus.
So he and colleagues came up with 16 combined ones, such as “happily disgusted” and “happily surprised.” Then the researchers asked volunteers to imagine situations that would provoke these emotions, such as listening to a gross joke, or getting unexpected good news.
When the team compared pictures of the volunteers making different faces and analyzed every eyebrow wrinkle, mouth stretch and tightened chin, “what we found was beyond belief,” Martinez says. For each compound emotion, almost everyone used the same facial muscles, the team reports March 31 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences…

More here

Science News

… “I thought it was very odd to have only one positive emotion,” says cognitive scientist Aleix Martinez of Ohio State University in Columbus.

So he and colleagues came up with 16 combined ones, such as “happily disgusted” and “happily surprised.” Then the researchers asked volunteers to imagine situations that would provoke these emotions, such as listening to a gross joke, or getting unexpected good news.

When the team compared pictures of the volunteers making different faces and analyzed every eyebrow wrinkle, mouth stretch and tightened chin, “what we found was beyond belief,” Martinez says. For each compound emotion, almost everyone used the same facial muscles, the team reports March 31 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

More here

Surprise!
Acid-bath method for making stem cells under fire
A surprisingly simple method for creating stem cells by dipping cells in acid has so far proven impossible to replicate, prompting calls for the original research papers, published in January [Nature], to be retracted. One of those calls is coming from inside the large group of collaborators that first introduced the STAP stem cells, a special kind of ultraflexible cell shown to produce any type of cell in the body and some in the placenta… More here

Surprise!

Acid-bath method for making stem cells under fire

A surprisingly simple method for creating stem cells by dipping cells in acid has so far proven impossible to replicate, prompting calls for the original research papers, published in January [Nature], to be retracted. One of those calls is coming from inside the large group of collaborators that first introduced the STAP stem cells, a special kind of ultraflexible cell shown to produce any type of cell in the body and some in the placenta… More here

Miguel Valderrabano
Alcohol may ease the nerves that cause atrial fibrillation
About 1 in 12 Americans over age 80 has atrial fibrillation, a kind of heart arrhythmia. Surgeons and cardiologists have come a long way, honestly, in treating the disorder, which weakens heart flow and significantly increases the chances of ischemia, as well as blood clot-caused strokes. Doctors have even figured out how to fix atrial fibrillation (also called a fib or a-fib) intravenously, via catheter.
The typical treatment now is to burn areas cardiac nerve clusters that are known to be part of the electrical cascade that causes a-fib. Sounds sort of dangerous, but it was the big breakthrough about 10 years ago.
Problem, though, is that this does not seem to be a permanent solution for a lot of people. The nerves somehow repair, or else nearby pathways are recruited for mayhem… and the a-fib returns.
A new technique involves doing all that burning stuff, but ALSO injecting 98% ethanol into a nerve cluster near one of the major cardiopulmonary veins. Electrophysiological measurements at the site (what CAN’T they do through catherers these days?) shows this might be a more permanent solution for a-fib patients.
More here.

Miguel Valderrabano

Alcohol may ease the nerves that cause atrial fibrillation

About 1 in 12 Americans over age 80 has atrial fibrillation, a kind of heart arrhythmia. Surgeons and cardiologists have come a long way, honestly, in treating the disorder, which weakens heart flow and significantly increases the chances of ischemia, as well as blood clot-caused strokes. Doctors have even figured out how to fix atrial fibrillation (also called a fib or a-fib) intravenously, via catheter.

The typical treatment now is to burn areas cardiac nerve clusters that are known to be part of the electrical cascade that causes a-fib. Sounds sort of dangerous, but it was the big breakthrough about 10 years ago.

Problem, though, is that this does not seem to be a permanent solution for a lot of people. The nerves somehow repair, or else nearby pathways are recruited for mayhem… and the a-fib returns.

A new technique involves doing all that burning stuff, but ALSO injecting 98% ethanol into a nerve cluster near one of the major cardiopulmonary veins. Electrophysiological measurements at the site (what CAN’T they do through catherers these days?) shows this might be a more permanent solution for a-fib patients.

More here.

Power And Syred/Science Photo Library
What your earwax says about your ancestry
… “We could obtain information about a person’s ethnicity simply by looking in his ears,” chemist Katharine Prokop-Prigge said. Prokop-Prigge is one of the researchers at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia who measured the earwax smells. The team was inspired to see if ethnic groups have different earwax odors after learning that the same gene controls both a person’s underarm odor and the type of earwax they make…
More here

Power And Syred/Science Photo Library

What your earwax says about your ancestry

… “We could obtain information about a person’s ethnicity simply by looking in his ears,” chemist Katharine Prokop-Prigge said. Prokop-Prigge is one of the researchers at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia who measured the earwax smells. The team was inspired to see if ethnic groups have different earwax odors after learning that the same gene controls both a person’s underarm odor and the type of earwax they make…

More here

wildcat2030:

Paralyzed woman walks again with 3D-printed robotic exoskeleton
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3D Systems, in collaboration with Ekso Bionics, has created a 3D-printed robotic exoskeleton that has restored the ability to walk in a woman paralyzed from the waist down. The Ekso-Suit was trialled and demonstrated by Amanda Boxtel, who was told by her doctor that she’d never walk again after a skiing accident in 1992. (via Paralyzed woman walks again with 3D-printed robotic exoskeleton)

(via decadentscience)

It’s no mere coincidence Charles Darwin’s birthday and Valentine’s Day are so close together. Oh, hold on. Yes, it is mere coincidence.

It’s no mere coincidence Charles Darwin’s birthday and Valentine’s Day are so close together. Oh, hold on. Yes, it is mere coincidence.

(Source: sharenitynow)

New live-cell printing technology works like ancient Chinese woodblocking
With a nod to 3rd century Chinese woodblock printing and children’s rubber stamp toys, researchers in Houston have developed a way to print living cells onto any surface, in virtually any shape. Unlike recent, similar work using inkjet printing approaches, almost all cells survive the process, scientists report in this week’s Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
The researchers, led by Houston Methodist Research Institute nanomedicine faculty member Lidong Qin, Ph.D., say their approach produces 2-D cell arrays in as little as half an hour, prints the cells as close together as 5 micrometers (most animal cells are 10 to 30 micrometers wide), and allows the use of many different cell types. They’ve named the technology Block-Cell-Printing, or BloC-Printing.
"We feel the current technologies are inadequate," Qin said. "Inkjet-based cell printing leaves many of the cells damaged or dead. We wanted to see if we could invent a tool that helps researchers obtain arrays of cells that are alive and still have full activity."
More here.

New live-cell printing technology works like ancient Chinese woodblocking

With a nod to 3rd century Chinese woodblock printing and children’s rubber stamp toys, researchers in Houston have developed a way to print living cells onto any surface, in virtually any shape. Unlike recent, similar work using inkjet printing approaches, almost all cells survive the process, scientists report in this week’s Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The researchers, led by Houston Methodist Research Institute nanomedicine faculty member Lidong Qin, Ph.D., say their approach produces 2-D cell arrays in as little as half an hour, prints the cells as close together as 5 micrometers (most animal cells are 10 to 30 micrometers wide), and allows the use of many different cell types. They’ve named the technology Block-Cell-Printing, or BloC-Printing.

"We feel the current technologies are inadequate," Qin said. "Inkjet-based cell printing leaves many of the cells damaged or dead. We wanted to see if we could invent a tool that helps researchers obtain arrays of cells that are alive and still have full activity."

More here.

beautedanslarue:

When you realize the value of all life, you dwell less on what is past and concentrate more on the preservation of the future.” 

— Dian Fossey (1932 - 1985) 

 

(Source: )